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Invisible Ancestor: The Galloway Nag and its Legacy

€64.00


Miriam A. Bibby

Publication date: April, 2024

Pages: 560, colour


ISBN 978-615-6696-15-1                        Paperback, €64.00

ISBN 978-615-6696-14-4                        Hardcover, €112.00

eISBN 978-615-6696-16-8                       eBook, €64.00


For any unavailable copies on our website, please refer to our distributors: ISD LLC for North and South America and EUROSPAN for Europe and the rest of the world.

Cover
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Maps & Illustrations

Acknowledgements


Introduction. A Beautiful Breed of Little Horses


PART I. TRACKING THE GALLOWAY: ORIGINS AND INFLUENCE

   Chapter 1. Horses from the Margin

   Chapter 2. The Galloway as the Best Breed in the North


PART II. “AND ALL THEIR NAGS ARE PRESBYTERIAN”: THE GALLOWAY, THE STUARTS, AND THE HAMILTONS

   Chapter 3. Satirical Nag: The Galloway from the Union of the Crowns to the Restoration

   Chapter 4. The Galloway Nag from Restoration to Culloden (And Its Aftermath)


PART III. BLACK SWAN: CHANGING TIMES, CHANGING GALLOWAYS

   Chapter 5. Our Racing Friends in the North

   Chapter 6. Industrial Interlude: Working Class Hero

   Chapter 7. Arab or Arabian? The Rise of the Orientalist “Arabian” Horse


PART IV. NO FRIENDS IN HIGH PLACES: EXIT THE GALLOWAY

   Chapter 8. Blood, Breeding, and the Byron-Milbanke Marriage

   Chapter 9. Annabella Milbanke’s Nose

   Chapter 10. “The Common Blood of Which We Are Trying to Rid Ourselves”

   Chapter 11. Heat, and Finally Light: Pseudo-Science and Science in the Search for Thoroughbred Origins

   Chapter 12. Idle Sentiment


Conclusion. Nothing Now Remains but the Name


Appendices

Bibliography

Data sheet

Author(s)
Miriam A. Bibby
Imprint
Trivent Medieval
Book series
Rewriting Equestrian History
Volume no.
6
Book series editor(s)
Anastasija Ropa, Timothy Dawson
ISBN (hardcover)
978-615-6696-14-4
ISBN (paperback)
978-615-6696-15-1
eISBN
978-615-6696-16-8
Publication date
April, 2024
Page numbers
560

Specific References

The outstanding qualities of the Galloway horse landrace are referenced in literary sources from the late sixteenth century onwards. Brief, but eloquent and revealing allusions appear in the work of William Shakespeare, Thomas Dekker, Ben Jonson, and other writers with connections to the Tudor, Stuart, Caroline, and Carolean courts. The Galloway nag was sufficiently influential for its name to become a generic widely applied to small horses of a certain type: speedy, enduring, and reliable. This is still the case in the north of England and Australia, where the terms “Gallowa” and “Galloway” continue to be used today. The Galloway contributed to a surprising number of modern horse breeds, including the Thoroughbred, yet few people are aware of its influence. Miriam A. Bibby shows how and why its contribution has been overwritten by other narratives. In doing so, she also reveals previously unexplored sources that indicate the complex role played by the imagined Galloway in Anglo-Scottish relations. Collectively these represent a unique new genre of commentary that she identifies as “Galloway Nag Satire.” This is the first major study devoted to the history of the Galloway horse. 

Miriam A. Bibby is an equine historian, author, and editor. She is co-editor-in-chief of Cheiron, the International Journal of Equine and Equestrian History and an affiliate of the University of Glasgow’s School of Interdisciplinary Studies. Miriam is a former course developer for the University of Manchester’s networked learning course in Egyptology and has worked for several museums and heritage organisations. Research curiosity about the relatively unknown Galloway horse, or nag, led to a PhD on the topic. Miriam has kept horses throughout her adult life, including Fell ponies, one of the breeds believed to be the closest relatives of the Galloway horse.

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